COLLEGIATE ACCESS PROGRAM (CAP)

COLLEGIATE ACCESS PROGRAM (CAP)

Our Rangers are among the most disciplined and skilled Warriors in the world and we are dedicated to helping them utilize their ingrained skills by empowering them to thrive in careers and at top Universities around the country. Through our Transition Programs, we are committed to helping our Rangers through the reintegration process, ensuring that they achieve their goals of a rewarding and prosperous civilian life.

Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund’s Collegiate Access Program (CAP), in collaboration with our partner organizations, provides Rangers interested in advanced education with valuable tools and resources to help them navigate the complicated process of selecting and applying to top-level Universities.

• Test Prep Assistance
• Application Process Assistance
• Attend a two-week Academic Boot Camp to preparefor the rigor of college classes
• Travel and tuition reimbursement AFTER completion of program

If you are a Ranger interested in learning more about our CAP program please email CAP@LeadTheWayFund.org.

“Regs Rock” Lacrosse Day for Heroes

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Spring is almost in the air which means it’s time for Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund’s Annual “Regs Rock” Lacrosse Day for Heroes fundraising event. This year’s event will take place on Saturday, April 9, 2016 at Manhasset High School in Manhasset, NY.

“Regs Rock” Lacrosse Day For Heroes is a 2-game shootout between two of the country’s best high school lacrosse teams, the Chaminade Flyers and the Manhasset Indians. GATES OPEN AT 12:30PM.

The day pays tribute to our Hero, Sgt. James J. Regan, and all the brave soldiers who have given their lives for our country and our freedom!

We are also very excited that Sergeant First Class (Ret) Cory Remsburg, who was severely wounded in 2009 and has made heroic strides with his recovery and rehabilitation, will be in attendance for this special day.

No advanced ticket sales and all seating is first come first serve. This event takes place RAIN or SHINE!

Suggested donation to Lead The Way Fund for Adults 18 yrs & Older:  $10.00  

Schedule of Events:

12:30 PM:        Gates open (main parking lot at Manhasset High School)

1:00  PM:         Chaminade Flyers Freshman Game vs TBD

3:30 PM           Manhasset Indians vs. Chaminade Flyers Junior Varsity Game

6:00 PM:          Manhasset Indians vs. Chaminade Flyers Varsity Game

Directions:      Parking for Manhasset Stadium is located at Manhasset High School, 200 Memorial Place, Manhasset, NY 11030 Google Map).  Additional parking is available at the parking lots of the Manhasset Park District to the east side of the Manhasset campus. . Main entrance to the stadium located rear of Manhasset High School.

 

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT AND WE LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR PARTICIPATION AT THE 2016 LEAD THE WAY LACROSSE DAY FOR HEROES.


File #0417-01A #31 Jimmy Regan Duke Photography ©2001

Buy a Ticket for The Barclays Golf Tournament and Support Lead The Way Fund!

From August 19-24, 2014, The Barclays Golf Tournament returns to the Championship Course at the historic Ridgewood Country Club, in Paramus, NJ.  We are excited to have been selected, for the first time, to participate in the special TICKETS fore CHARITY (TFC) fundraising program for this event. This unique initiative helps raise funds and awareness for local non-profits where PGA Tour events are held and is a great way for Golf enthusiasts to attend this prestigious event AND support your favorite charity at the same time!

75% of the net proceeds from your purchase of a One-Day ticket or a Weekly Grounds ticket will be donated by the PGA Tour to Lead The Way Fund. Tickets can be purchased through August 17, 2014.

To purchase your tickets for this event, please click the ticket options below which will take you to the Ticketmaster page. Be sure to use our unique promotional/offer code:  LONGDRIVE14 (MUST BE ALL CAPS!).

 

GOOD ANY ONE DAY GROUNDS TICKET $65

WEEKLY GROUNDS TICKETS $125

 

Thank you for your continued support of our Rangers and families of the 75th Ranger Regiment.

RANGERS LEAD THE WAY!

Sincerely,

Lead The Way Fund

NYC 1/2 Marathon

Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund is excited to announce that, for the first time, we have obtained slots at the NYC Half-Marathon which takes place on Sunday, March 16, 2014 in New York City.

The 2014 NYC Half will take runners on a spectacular 13.1-mile tour of NYC. Led by a talent-packed roster of American and international elites, runners will stop traffic in Manhattan, from Central Park through Times Square to South Street Seaport!

Please note that all runners are required to meet the minimum Lead The Way Fund fundraising requirement  of $1500 and cover NYRR entry fees of $250.

All members of Team Army Ranger will receive Lead The Way Fund racing gear including performance training shirts,  hats, visors, gear bag and more.

To join Team Army Ranger or for more information about this great running event please email racing@leadthewayfund.org with interest.

Army Rangers Hold Rare Public Ceremony to Celebrate Service, Sacrifice

By David Poe
Northwest Guardian

TACOMA, Wash. (May 10, 2012) Pfc. Joshua Overly, a Ranger from 2-75 Rngr., receives a Bronze Star Medal from Lt. Col. David Hodne, his battalion commander, in Tacoma, May 10. “(Our family) has used it as an opportunity to learn about our country’s history and the history of the world,” Carol Overly, Joshua's mother, said. “Seeing the work that my boys do now — the physical training, the mental training — it’s astounding the amount of hard work they do. It’s made me proud — proud of our country and all of the men and women in the military.
Lt. Gen. John F. Mulholland, U.S. Army Special Operations Command commander, affixes a Valorous Unit Award streamer to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment colors in Tacoma, Wash., May 10, 2012. The Ranger battalion received two in the rare public ceremony for actions in Iraq and Afghanistan in 2005.

TACOMA, Wash. (USASOC News Service, May 15, 2012) – The U.S. Army Ranger story is typically a closed book, but Joint Base Lewis-McChord’s Rangers opened the pages of their latest chapter for an evening last week. The South Sound community had the rare opportunity to join 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, in recognizing its own at the Tacoma Dome, May 10.

More than 50 Rangers received commendations, which ranged from Army Commendation medals to a Silver Star for combat and non-combat action going back to 2005. The battalion also received two Valorous Unit awards for actions in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Since Sept. 11, 2001, 2-75th Rangers has deployed for Overseas Contingency Operations 14 times. Their most recent Operation Enduring Freedom deployment concluded in December. During the five-month rotation they conducted 475 combat operations where they lost four rangers and one attached Soldier.

Staff Sgt. Sean Keough received the Silver Star for courage under fire in Afghanistan last year. The Silver Star is America’s third highest combat decoration.

Last fall, Keough, serving as a Ranger rifleman and squad leader, was part of a joint task force conducting a raid on a Taliban compound. When a comrade was injured during the assault, Keough positioned himself between the wounded Ranger and insurgent fire so that other task force members could administer medical aid.

After he and another teammate eliminated a charging insurgent, he was hit by enemy fire and still held his position between the enemy and his downed teammate as his squad radioed for a medevac. Refusing treatment throughout a long firefight, he continued his integral part of the mission, helping the team to overtake the enemy compound eight hours later. He also received a Purple Heart for the wounds he suffered during that engagement.

Lt. Gen. John F. Mulholland, commander of U.S. Army Special Operations Command, traveled from his Fort Bragg, N.C., headquarters for the event. He said to be a part of a night when so many Rangers were honored for heroic deeds was awe inspiring.

“That convergence — that range of valor is extraordinary,” he said, “and by itself should tell us what it means to be a Ranger, and to be a Ranger battalion.”

Five 2-75th Rangers noncommissioned officers received Soldier’s Medals for rescuing two climbers atop Alaska’s Mount Denali a year ago. At 20,320 feet, the mountain formerly known as “McKinley” is the highest peak in North America.

The Soldier’s Medal is an award recognizing life-risking heroism that didn’t involve an enemy. The recipients were Sgt. 1st Class. Joseph Lachnit, Staff Sgt. Austin McCall, Staff Sgt. Keith Pierce and Staff Sgt. David Ray, and Sgt. Kyle Cresto.

Seven Rangers received Bronze Star Medals with “V” devices for valor during the ceremony. Pfc. Joshua Overly, 24, was one of them. During a 2011 firefight, the Ranger rifleman drew enemy fire and eliminated the threat so that two injured troops could be safely reached and extracted.

The native of nearby Gig Harbor shied away from the “hero” label.

“I was just in a bad situation and I did my job; that’s what it boils down to,” he said. “Anybody in my unit could have been in the same exact situation as me and did the exact same thing.”

Overly said he was glad his family and friends could see his fellow Rangers, instead of just hearing his stories about them.

“(The ceremony) gave my family a sneak peek of the men that I’m surrounded by,” Overly said. “I could tell them on the phone that I’m in the company of heroes at all times — it means a little bit more for them to see it and hear it from somebody else.”

Carol Overly, Joshua’s mother, said she appreciated that opportunity. As a mother of two enlisted military members, (another son, Joel, is a Marine stationed at Camp Pendleton, Calif.), she said last week’s ceremony provided her valuable lessons.

“(Our family) has used it as an opportunity to learn about our country’s history and the history of the world,” she said. “Seeing the work that my boys do now — the physical training, the mental training — it’s astounding the amount of hard work they do. It’s made me proud — proud of our country and all of the men and women in the military.”

Lt. Col. David Hodne, 2-75th Rangers commander, said the openness of the ceremony was a reminder that though Ranger operational missions are shrouded in security, it’s important to touch base with a public that might know the legend of the Army Ranger, yet never have the opportunity to shake his hand.

“The community is insulated from the Rangers when we’re only in our compound, and they are our biggest fans and supporters,” he said, “so when you talk about getting a perspective on what these great Rangers are doing, there’s no better way to do it.”

Hodne also said any benefit to the community was matched by appreciation from his ranks.

“After now more than 10 years of war, for families to celebrate amongst themselves — to do this in isolation — they’ve done that for years,” he said. “Over time it’s difficult to continue when you think you’re alone in your effort in fighting the war. These men get up every day and do the hard jobs — without complaint.”