Jeff Hussey Speaks to Garden City Life about his Efforts for Lead The Way Fund

 

Pushing It To The Limit Three Ways

Written by Dr. Cynthia Paulis, gardencity@antonnews.com Thursday, 04 September 2014

Jeffrey Hussey (Photo by Dr. Cynthia Paulis)

Locals run for themselves and a cause in triathalon

At 6 a.m on a blustery Saturday morning, 1600 people arrived at Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park to participate in the 27th annual Runner’s Edge Tobay Triathlon and Tri-Relay Race. The participants were drawn from a wide age range. They came from all over Long Island and upstate New York, a few were from out of state, and in some cases, had disabilities. But they all came with one goal in mind — to finish.

Jeffrey Hussey, a 28-year-old Garden City resident, has done this race three times and this was his fifth triathlon this summer.

“I got into this after school. I work in finance and I started to put on a little weight. I used to play college lacrosse and I knew as an athlete, this was not what I wanted, so I got into triathlons. I lost 25 pounds, got healthier and I feel great every day.”

Sporting a camouflage outfit, Hussey went on to explain that he also runs for a reason.

“I run for Lead the Way Fund. It is a local Long Island Fund in honor of Jimmy Reagan. He was a Chaminade boy who played lacrosse and gave up a Wall Street law degree opportunity to serve in the military and unfortunately lost his life in Afghanistan at 24. I work with the Lead the Way fund and help raise money and awareness for wounded army Rangers and their families.”

Parents Bob and Deb Hussey were at the finish line to cheer their son on. Deb Hussey was beaming as her son crossed the finish line. “I am extremely proud of my son. I always have been. He does this probably eight times a year and he always chooses a wonderful [organization] to support. For the past four years, he has been running for the veterans, which is so important.”

The course starts out as a half mile swim in Oyster Bay Harbor, then a 9.3 mile bike ride through Oyster Bay, Laurel Hollow, and Cove Neck. The route is very hilly but finishes with a 2.9 mile downhill to the finish. The riders then have one more leg of the race—a 3.2 mile run through Mill Neck and Brookville, up to Planting Fields Arboretum and back down to Roosevelt Park to the finish line.

Matthew Loesch is a 36-year-old Garden City resident who works in finance and has done this 14 times. He explained how triathlon changed his life.

“It promotes discipline. Instead of going to the doctor and spending money on co-pays, I put it towards triathlon entry fees. It’s a lot of fun and forces you to get out and do things.”

 

Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund & Jared Allen’s Home 4 Wounded Warriors Collaborate on SFC Cory Remsburg’s Home

LTWF Logo 2014                 Jared Allens Home 4 Wounded Warriors

ARMY RANGER LEAD THE WAY FUND AND JARED ALLEN’S HOMES FOR WOUNDED WARRIORS ANNOUNCE PARTNERSHIP

TO PROVIDE A BRAND NEW, HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE HOME TO LOCAL WOUNDED WAR VETERAN

Phoenix, AZ., Tuesday, May 20, 2014 – Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund and Five-Time NFL Pro Bowler, Jared Allen, and Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors are excited to announce their recent collaboration effort to purchase, remodel and donate a handicap accessible home in Gilbert, Arizona to local wounded war veteran, Army Ranger, Sergeant First Class (SFC) Cory Remsburg. Since 2007, Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund has been dedicated to assisting our active duty & wounded elite Special Operations U.S. Army Rangers, and the families of Rangers who have been killed, with health, wellness and other financial aid programs beyond what the Government and Veterans Affairs are able to offer. The Fund has been supporting SFC Remsburg and his family since he sustained his life altering injuries in 2009.

Modifications to the home will be completed by, Veteran-owned, Peak One Builders and Restoration. Adaptations will include: widening of all doorways, installation of all new appliances and fixtures in the bathrooms and kitchens and as well as new flooring. The house will also include a large gym for Cory’s extensive rehab; a guest home for Cory’s live-in caregiver; an automated home control system; and a wheel-in pool for underwater rehabilitation with a therapeutic jacuzzi.

Additional financial contributions to this project were made by Ride 430, an annual 430 mile charity bicycle ride which is operated by The Free Wheel Foundation. For more information visit http://www.ride430.com

“When we were introduced to Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors we knew immediately that collaborating with them to purchase and modify this home for Cory was going to be a good partnership. Working together has given us the ability to make the assets we have available through our Wounded Ranger Recovery Program to go much further, stated James P. Regan, Chairman & CEO.  “Cory is an extraordinary young man. Having seen how far he has come through his recovery and rehabilitation efforts, it is an honor to purchase this home for him and help him regain some of the independence he has longed for. With several other Rangers in the queue for homes, and in need of our assistance, we look forward to working with Jared Allen’s team again on these future projects,” Regan added.

“I first heard Sgt First Class Cory Remsburg’s incredible story in 2013 and knew that he was someone we needed to assist. Through current supporters of my charity, Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors, we were able to reach out to The Army Ranger Lead the Way Fund who had been helping Remsburg out since his injury in 2009. We knew right away that this was a perfect partnership between our two organizations and together we could make a true positive impact in the life of another hero. We look forward to completing this home for Cory Remsburg and continuing to work with The Army Ranger Lead the Way Fund.”

–           Jared Allen

ABOUT ARMY RANGER, CORY REMSBURG:

Army Ranger, Cory Remsburg, joined the Army when he was 18 years old. He went through rigorous and specialized training to become an elite Army Ranger, and was deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan 10 times. He spent a total of 39 months in combat and was eventually promoted to be the leader of his company’s heavy weapons squad. On October 1, 2009, Remsburg and his platoon hit a roadside bomb in Kandahar, Afghanistan and the immediate explosion nearly killed him. He was found face down in a pool of water with shrapnel lodged in his brain. Remsburg was in a coma for more than three months and after undergoing dozens of surgeries, he is still blind in his right eye and is partially paralyzed on his left side. After years of rehabilitation centers and hospitals, Remsburg now lives at home with a full-time caregiver in Phoenix, Arizona.

ABOUT RANGER LEAD THE WAY FUND:

Lead The Way Fund, Inc. is a non-profit organization established to raise funds in support of disabled U.S. Army Rangers and the families of Rangers who have died, been injured or are currently serving in harm’s way around the world. Lead The Way Fund, Inc. will provide spouses and children of deceased, disabled or active duty Rangers with assistance for health and wellness programs and other services determined to be vital to the family’s well-being, beyond what the government can offer.  For more information please visit:  https://www.leadthewayfund.org

ABOUT JARED ALLENS HOMES FOR WOUNDED WARRIORS:

Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors is a non-profit organization created for the sole purpose of raising money to build or modify homes for America’s injured Military Veterans. Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors was established in October of 2009 after NFL Star, Jared Allen returned home from a trip to the US Military Bases in the Middle East.  Jared was moved by the commitment, dedication and sacrifices that our soldiers make every day to protect our freedom.  It is Jared’s hope that this foundation will help make the lives of wounded vets a little bit easier.

For more information please visit: http://www.homesforwoundedwarriors.com

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2014 TOBAY TRIATHLON

Incredible job done by all of our Tobay Triathletes yesterday! They all rocked it and it was so fun to watch them! Many of them were first-timers to a Triathlon, but all brought their A-game in support of LTWF and our Rangers! Thank you for your fundraising efforts and your dedication!

Jeff Hussey
Katie Bottini
Peter LeSeur
Nick Isnardi
Nolan Brock
Tim Carey
John O’Brien
Michael Buckley
Dan Geraghty

Check out the TOBAY Triathlon album just posted to see photos of the day and these LTWF supporters in action!

Rangers Lead The Way

The Legacy of Jimmy Regan

The Legacy of Jimmy Regan
Monday 05/26/2014  –  Leslie Gaber, Duke Sports Information

When the Duke men’s lacrosse team takes the field each weekend in the spring, the players’ uniforms bear a subtle yet powerful tribute to one of their own.

On the back of the Blue Devils’ helmets, opposite the American flag, lies a small, black rectangular box with white font bearing the text “JR 10.”

The insignias honor the late Sgt. James John Regan, or “Jimmy” as he was known at Duke. The Long Island native was a midfielder for the Blue Devils from 1999-02 and was killed in action in 2007 while serving in the United States Army’s 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment in Iraq.

A native of Manhasset, N.Y., Regan was born in 1980 to James and Mary Regan. He graduated from Chaminade High School in Mineola, N.Y., and went on to play lacrosse and study economics at Duke. The midfielder helped guide the Blue Devils to a four-year record of 43-21 with a pair of ACC titles in 2001 and 2002 and four NCAA Tournament appearances. He was named to the 2002 ACC All-Tournament team after scoring a career-high four goals and adding an assist as Duke defeated then top-ranked Virginia, 14-13, in the championship game.

An Academic All-ACC selection, Regan finished his collegiate career with 22 goals and four assists.

“Just a terrific personality. Always a smile on his face. His teammates just loved to be around him,” former Duke coach Mike Pressler told USA Today in 2007. “He was the kind of kid that every coach in America would be proud to call his own. I can’t imagine a better teammate or a better friend.”

Following his graduation from Duke in the spring of 2002, Regan turned down a job offer from UBS (a financial services company) and a scholarship to Southern Methodist University’s law school to enlist in the Army. Surprising many of his friends and family members, he chose to enter the U.S. Army Ranger School, emailing his former teammates the explanation “This is what I have to do.”

Regan went on to graduate first in his class in infantry basic combat training. After completing the basic airborne course and Ranger Indoctrination program at Fort Benning in Georgia, he became a member of the 3rd Battalion.

Regan served as a machine gunner, gun team leader and then fire team leader during two deployments each to Afghanistan and Iraq, as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. His service in the Army was to end in February of 2008. He and his fiancée, Mary McHugh, had made plans to marry and move to Chicago upon his return to the United States, and he had hopes of becoming a social studies teacher and lacrosse coach.

Regan was killed Feb. 9, 2007 in northern Iraq when an improvised explosive device (IED) targeted his vehicle. He was 26.

Survived by his parents and three sisters, Regan was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal and Purple Heart, in addition to a number of other decorations earned during his years of service. The Roman Catholic Church in Manhasset was packed beyond capacity for his funeral, including 600 flag-waving students from the local high school and many of the businesses nearby displaying his photo in their windows. He was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery.

The nonprofit Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund was founded in Regan’s honor by his family and friends, and today continues to assist wounded and fallen Army Rangers and their families through health and wellness programs and other services. “Through the Lead The Way Fund, his family and friends strive to honor his spirit, his patriotism and the way he lived his life by combining our efforts to give back to his brothers, the U.S. Army Rangers,” reads part of the mission statement.

Annual events such as “A Run Down Hero Highway” and the “Lead The Way Lacrosse Day for Heroes” support these efforts. In the coming months, LTWF has charity fund-raising slots secured for the San Francisco Marathon (July), the Army Ten-Miler at the Pentagon (October) and the New York City Marathon (November). A pair of “Shootout For Soldiers” 24-hour lacrosse games will be held in Baltimore and Long Island this summer. This year’s LTWF gala benefit was scheduled for May 21 at Chelsea Piers in New York, with CBS This Morning co-anchor Charlie Rose (Duke ‘64) as master of ceremonies.

Regan’s father serves as the CEO of the Lead The Way Fund, with the board and advisory committee loaded with many of his son’s former high school and college friends and teammates. First Lady Michelle Obama last month commended the work done by Lead The Way in a speech she gave for Joining Forces, another military support organization she founded with Jill Biden three years ago.

Although several classes of Blue Devils have come and gone since Regan’s death, his legacy continues to live on within the program. A memorial display and his framed No. 10 jersey hang outside the team’s locker room. His initials and number remain on the players’ helmets for every game.

With the return of defenseman Casey Carroll to Duke last year, the reminders of Regan’s service to his country have been even more constant.

Carroll was a first team All-America selection for the Blue Devils as a senior in 2007. He cites Regan’s story as being influential in his decision to also join the United States Army following graduation.

“It was my senior year when Jimmy Regan died,” Carroll says. “That really moved me when Coach (John Danowski) told us about his story. I found that the best way I could honor him and also blaze my own way through life would be to try to follow in his footsteps. I just set my mind to it. Fifth year of eligibility, that went right out the window for me.”

Coming from a family that had ties to military service as well, Carroll enlisted in the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment — the same unit Regan had served in.

After spending 2007-12 in the U.S. Army with tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, Carroll returned to Durham to pursue an MBA at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business. With one year of eligibility remaining due to injury, he was also able to get back on the field for the Blue Devils, joining his teammates in honoring Regan every time they don their helmets. And although Carroll tends to shy away from the spotlight, he is eager to share Regan’s story.

“As far as we saw, he was the toughest guy in the world,” Carroll said. “He’s a guy that we all looked up to, whether guys knew of him personally or just knew of his story. I felt that would be a really great way to honor his memory.”

For more information on the Lead The Way Fund, visit leadthewayfund.org.